Letter: Russian invasion feels similar to past events

Published:

Russia's

invasion into Ukraine made me think of another time when another progressive U.S. president watched a ruthless European power grow more aggressive. He was the leader of the Progressive Movement, he served as President of Princeton University.

With the Republican Party split, he led his Democratic Party to control both the White House and Congress for the first time in nearly two decades. In his first term as president, he persuaded a Democratic Congress to pass a legislative agenda that few presidents have equaled. An intellectual with a mastery of political language, he was a highly effective partisan campaigner as well as legislative strategist. No, not President Barack Obama, but Thomas Woodrow Wilson (Dec. 28, 1856 - Feb. 3, 1924), the 28th president of the United States, in office from 1913 to 1921.

Narrowly re-elected in 1916, Wilson's second term was dominated by American entry into World War I. It is weakness that provokes aggression, however men like Wilson and Obama believe strength provokes aggression. These type of men are appalled by projected American strength, and Wilson's inaction heightened German aggression.

Going to war with Russia is not the answer; however besides Obama's feckless economic sanctions there are real things that can be done to temper this siege: 1. Return the missile defense system in Poland. Putin pushed Obama to abandon this, and Obama did just to show Russia how much we want to be friends. It's Poland and the other eastern bloc true friends that are left exposed. 2. Authorize the Keystone pipeline and expand domestic drilling: Putin has Europe in a stranglehold with energy supply. With energy from the west, EUR and the US become less dependent on oligarchs.

The world is watching, and unchecked aggression by Russia has consequences, and I'm concerned that history may be repeating itself.

James Vaughn, Hudson

Want to leave your comments?

Sign in or Register to comment.