Where in Hudson is this? for April 2

by Liz murphy | destination hudson Published:

The courtyard in last week's column is between the Burton D. Morgan Foundation on Aurora Street (the former Library) and the Baldwin House. I am amazed that anyone recognized it, because the fountain in the picture (taken last fall) was put away and replaced with a balled tree for the holidays. The fountain will be back when it warms up. The courtyard was designed by the Burton D. Morgan Foundation's landscaper and architects in the 2006-2007 time frame. It can be seen from Division and Aurora Streets, and occupies the space left when the connecting structure between the old Library and the Baldwin House was removed. The black iron fence is mostly old fencing that was adapted, with a few new sections crafted to make it work.  

Now for a bit of Hudson history, let's jump back 208 years, well before there was anything like an Acme or Heinen's in Hudson. (No frozen or prepared entrees, no handy bottles of wine, no frozen appetizers, no prepared loaves of bread, no bags of spinach or nicely presented vegetables). Owen Brown and his family had just arrived. As reported earlier, in the early 1800's supplies were hard to come by, the nearest mill being 25 miles away. According to Hudson's Heritage (a new favorite source of Hudson history, second only to Tom Vince), the Brown family often found themselves very low on food. Owen, like Heman Oviatt, developed a good relationship with the Indians, who in his words "were more numerous than the white people" and they supplied the Brown family with venison, turkey and fish. Once supplies were more available, hungry Indians never left Owen's door without gifts of bread and meal. The Hudson tradition of giving food to those in need continues today, with neighbor helping neighbor, and generous donations to the Akron-Canton and Cleveland Food Banks, and Hudson's own Food Pantry.

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