Upcoming authors at the Learned Owl

Published:

Artist Sabuda May 3

Robert Sabuda, renowned artist and pop-up book designer, is coming to The Learned Owl on May 3. The book store is delighted to be able to offer breakfast with the author at 9:30 a.m. at the Hudson Visitor's Center on the upper level of the First and Main Parking lot, followed by a book signing and chat at the shop until noon. For $45 people will have a seat at breakfast, catered by Hudson's Restaurant, and a copy of Mr. Sabuda's most recent work, "The Little Mermaid."

Adult novelist Zevin stops by May 8

Gabrielle Zevin, author of several young adult novels and the wonderful new adult title "The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry" will be at The Learned Owl Book Shop on May 8 from 5:30 to 7 p.m.

Come for a wine and cheese reception to meet the author. Copies of this new title purchased at the event will be given a 25 percent discount.

A faded sign hangs above the porch of the Victorian cottage that is home to Island Books. It bears the adage "No main is an island; every book is a world." A. J. Fikry, the bookstore's irascible owner, is about to discover what that means. The novel remind people of what saves everyone ​from a life of loneliness and isolation: a sense of empathy, an ability to love and be loved and a willingness to care and be cared for.

Gabrielle Zevin's debut, "Margarettown," was a selection of the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program. Of all her books, she is probably best known for the young adult novel "Elsewhere," an American Library Association Notable Children's Book. It was nominated for a Quill Award and has been translated into over 20 languages. The NYTimes Book Review wrote, "Every so often a book comes along with a premise so fresh and arresting it seems to exist in a category all its own... Elsewhere, by Gabrielle Zevin, is such a book."

Zevin is a graduate of Harvard University and after many years on Manhattan's Upper West Side, recently moved to Silver Lake, Los Angeles.

'Don't Push the

Button' author May 10

Join The Learned Owl as author Bill Cotter visits to talk about his children's book "Don't Push the Button!" on May 10 at 10:30 a.m. Cotter will read, lead a sing-a-long and sign books. Bring the children in at 10 a.m. so they can make their buttons ahead of time.

A playful, smart, interactive picture book debut, "Don't Push the Button!" combines the popularity of monsters with the imaginative, engaging give-and-take of tales like "Press Here." Children are encouraged to push and shake the book and laugh along with Larry the lovable monster.

Cotter lives in NYC and teaches art and music to children of all ages.

Ohlson visits May 10

The Learned Owl will host author Kristin Ohlson with her book, "The Soil Will Save Us" on May 10 at 1 p.m. Start planting season off with a fascinating read about the condition of farming and the environment and how we can all make a difference.

Thousands of years of poor farming and ranching practices -- and especially, modern industrial agriculture -- have led to the loss of up to 80 percent of carbon from the world's soils. That carbon is now floating in the atmosphere, and even if we stopped using fossil fuels today, it would continue warming the planet. In "The Soil Will Save Us" journalist and bestselling author Kristin Ohlson makes an elegantly argued, passionate case for "our great green hope"--a way in which we can not only heal the land but also turn atmospheric carbon into beneficial soil carbon--and potentially reverse global warming.

As the granddaughter of farmers and the daughter of avid gardeners, Ohlson has long had an appreciation for the soil. A chance conversation with a local chef led her to the crossroads of science, farming, food, and environmentalism and the discovery of the only significant way to remove carbon dioxide from the air--an ecological approach that tends not only to plants and animals but also to the vast population of underground microorganisms that fix carbon in the soil. Ohlson introduces the visionaries--scientists, farmers, ranchers and landscapers--who are figuring out in the lab and on the ground how to build healthy soil, which solves myriad problems: drought, erosion, air and water pollution, and food quality as well as climate change. Her discoveries and vivid storytelling will revolutionize the way people think about food, landscapes, the plants and people's relationship to Earth.

Author, Springstubb comes to read May 17

The Learned Owl Bookshop will host local author Tricia Springstubb as a storytime reader on the Saturday of Children's Book Week, May 17. Springstubb, a Cleveland resident and book critic for The Plain Dealer, will be in the store from 11 a.m. to noon reading her favorite children's book "Sylvester and the Magic Pebble" by William Steig. Bring children for this event in support of reading and independent bookstores.

Springstubb has a number of published children's books and worked with several highly regarded editors before taking time out to put her daughters through college. Her Scholastic Little Apple title "Two Plus One Makes Trouble" which sold well over 100,000 copies, and her story "Last Summer" appeared in an anthology alongside work by Lois Lowry and Robert Cormier. Springstubb has been a writer-in-residence and guest author in schools.

In 2009 one of Springstubb's short stories won the Iowa Review Fiction Award, judged by Ann Patchett. She is also a recipient of an Ohio Arts Council grant for her work.

Author, professor Murray visits May 24

The Learned Owl, when we welcome author Joe Murray, Kent State professor and pilot, with his book "Lost in Oscar Hotel" on May 24 at 1 p.m.

Joe and a Vietnam-era flight surgeon set out to fly a couple of aviation's holy relics to Wright Brothers Airport in Dayton. It's the 75th anniversary of the airplane that taught a half-million veterans to fly. Take off with them - in the wrong direction. Fly from sunrise to sunset for 10 days; low enough to smile at farmers, slow enough to count your blessings. Cover 44,825 square miles and land in every Ohio county.

This is a true, strange record of hours, alongside an accounting of odd discoveries, beautifully captured photographs and the spinning of flying tales. It is a story of love and a nearly forgotten secret: airplanes were the original internet, invented to bring people in this world together.

For information on any of these events, call 330-653-2252.

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