Peet's Cofee & Tea closes in Hudson as Open Door Coffee thrives

by Tim Troglen | reporter Published:

Hudson -- Two coffee shops in Hudson have been on opposite courses, with one recently closing and another thriving.

Peet's Coffee & Tea, 34 Park Lane in Hudson, closed its doors at 7 p.m. Aug. 3.

The reason for the closure was unclear.

Company officials did not return calls for comment, and the local owner was not at the shop during two phone calls asking for a comment.

The shop, formerly a Caribou Coffee, opened earlier this year under the Peet's banner, a West Coast-based company, according to Regan Gettens, vice president/property management of Fairmount Properties, which manages the First & Main shopping district.

Gettens was advised by Peet's corporate offices that several of its shops in the Ohio and Pennsylvania area would be closing, according to Gettens.

"It comes as somewhat of a shock to us and also a disappointment," Gettens said July 31. "Given the good relationship that we had with Caribou prior to Peet's assuming the lease a little less than a year ago."

Gettens said that perhaps the change from a comfortable interior, with couches, dark wood and a fire place, when the shop was under the Caibou name, to a more brightly lit, open West Coast look might not have been the best fit for Hudson.

One door closes,

another opens

The comfortable and welcoming interior seems to be working for the owners of the Open Door Coffee Company, 164 N. Main St., which is located in the former Saywell's Drug building.

"I don't think we could be much happier," owner Charles Pinnell said of the business, which opened in early June.

Pinnell co-manages the shop, which is not a franchise, with his wife, Deborah. The shop has 10 employees, according to Pinnell.

"We are in the perfect location, Pinnell said of the shop, which occupies the former Hattie's Cafe spot, across from the Clock Tower. "It's within reach of everybody and within walking distance of a lot of residential areas."

The shop's interior is a mixture of new decor and historic Hudson, according to Pinnell. The interior includes high tops chairs and tables, mixed with leather couches in the window and tables made from old doors, he added.

"It gives it the look of a living room type of setup," Pinnell said.

The interior seating allows customers to enjoy their beverages while looking at the Green and downtown goings on.

"We want to be a destination for the community," Pinnell said. "And our priority, above all, is the quality of what is in your cup every day. That is the top priority."

Comfort, culture, art and music are also important, Pinnell added.

He attributes the success of his shop to being able to get a historic location, steeped in local history, he said. The mix appeals to both the older and younger generations, Pinnell said.

The shop also offers daily fresh home-bake goods and carries a line of homemade health bars.

"We are building the business slow and carefully," Pinnell said. "But it is growing."

Pinnell said he was grateful the city of Hudson has embraced the shop.

For more information on the shop, visit www.opendoor-coffee.com.

Email: ttroglen@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-541-9435

Facebook: TimTroglenRPC

Twitter: @Trog_RPC

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  • I was in Peet's Saturday (Aug 2), the service was horrendous, no products on shelves. restrooms filthy but they had plenty of traffic in the store.

    This morning I called Peet's corporate offices to complain and learned the store closed on Sunday, Aug. 3rd. The explanation I was given was they weren't meeting corporate goals.

    I told them with the traffic I saw and the location they should have examined management and operations locally not just numbers remotely. Indicating I wasn't volunteering but as a business owner for 40 years I could have turned that store into a winner quickly. It isn't rocket science, it's customer service, a good product and availability of product and accessories for sale including fresh pastries. The employee's should be serving customer courtesously not with an attitude. Maybe the pink slips had something to do with that but in the long-term Peet's seems to have a low threshold for pain and no interest in working with individual stores and districts.

    As an entrepreneur I stand by my belief that CEOs of large corporations don't have the talent to run and operate a small business. They couldn't manage that single store as an owner operator - they have no real vested interest.