Gun advocates conflicted on changes after massacre

STEVE PEOPLES Associated Press Published:

KITTERY, Maine (AP) -- In a region where gun ownership is a cherished right, holiday shoppers snake through rows of shotguns, pistols and semi-automatic assault rifles at the Kittery Trading Post in Maine.

The school massacre in Connecticut -- and potential changes to firearms laws because of it -- is fresh on their minds.

AR-15 assault rifles in particular have been flying off the shelves in the Kittery store and elsewhere. That's according to a trade group that attributes the sales boom to fears among gun owners that the weapon will be outlawed.

Among the aisles packed with bullets and used firearms, shoppers say they are deeply conflicted about the proper response to the massacre.