Will Your Country's Pollution Problem Be Solved by a Teenager

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ROCKVILLE CENTRE, NY -- (Marketwired) -- 05/28/14 -- With the belief that the solution to pollution lies in technology and engineering, the Center for Science Teaching & Learning (CSTL) has announced the ten finalist teams for the Clean Tech Competition on May 30 at Long Island Forum for Technology's (LIFT) Morrelly Homeland Security Center in Bethpage from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The challenge is intended to spark students' interest in engineering and environmental science so they can pursue those fields in the workforce. With the help of CSTL's many sponsors, teams were able to solve environmental issues that affect people's everyday lives.

The finalists include teams from Illinois, California, and eight teams from Singapore.

CSTL and the Clean Tech Competition challenged students to develop "A Solution to Pollution" and asked participants to identify, describe, analyze, and design a written solution for a major pollution problem that affects the population in their local area or individuals around the world. Contestants were required to use clean technology to address the problem, which will ultimately help human needs and improve lives. Teams of students (ages 15-18 years old) submitted their written projects on March 7.

This year's sponsors include Applied Materials; D&B Engineers and Architects, PC; The Dow Chemical Company; Long Island Forum for Technology (LIFT); and Stony Brook University - School of Engineering.

Fifty semi-finalists were chosen on April 7. On April 14, ten finalist teams were named. Contestants presented innovative solutions to various types of pollution. Each finalist team was assigned a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) mentor from a prestigious university or corporation to guide them, along with a $200 stipend.

Teams will present their projects to the judges, which will include a prototype, a slideshow (optional), and up to two posters (optional). The first-place winner will receive $15,000.

"We are so excited for the final competition," says Dr. Ray Ann Havasy, Administrator of the Competition, and Director of The Center for Science Teaching and Learning (CSTL). "These global teams have an immense amount of talent. We cannot wait for our judges to assess their innovative projects that focus on STEM research and real-life pollution issues."

For more information visit www.cleantechcompetition.org, or call 516-764-0045.

Hank Russell Lauren Maio PRMG (631) 207-1057